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All About Ellen

Ellen is a 44-year-old mother of three wondrous kids, aged 5, 7 and 9. At the age of 39, two weeks after the birth of her third child, she was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast with axillary metastasis. She spent a very full year of parental leave undergoing chemotherapy, mastectomy with axillary node dissection, and radiation therapy, and is currently on endocrine therapy. Her favourite past times include:

(1) doting over her children
(2) blasting unknowing bloggers with puns, and
(3) kicking cancer to the curb, then swiftly backing over it with a dump truck 

This blog chronicles her experience in being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer immediately following child birth, or as she likes to refer to it, from kegels to chemo and beyond. 


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Faith

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Wishes do come true. But only if you make them happen. 
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